OPEN COMMUNICATION: Prostate cancer is one of the most important health issues faced by Australian men with one in seven Aussie men being diagnosed in their lifetime. Darling Downs Health prostate cancer nurse Jo Hiscock is encouraging everyone to have open conversations about this health issue.
OPEN COMMUNICATION: Prostate cancer is one of the most important health issues faced by Australian men with one in seven Aussie men being diagnosed in their lifetime. Darling Downs Health prostate cancer nurse Jo Hiscock is encouraging everyone to have open conversations about this health issue. DDHHS

This is the most deadly health issue faced by Aussie men

JO HISCOCK wants men to open up and start talking about their prostate health.

The Darling Downs Health prostate cancer nurse says prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men with over 200,000 Australian men living with the disease.

The months of September is National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, and as a passionate advocate for men's health, Darling Downs Health Prostate Cancer Nurse Jo Hiscock encourages everyone to have open conversations about this health issue.

"We need to advocate for men as quite often they don't speak up for themselves,” Ms Hiscock said.

"Alarmingly each year, 20,000 more Australian men receive the diagnosis they have prostate cancer.

Meaning one in every seven men will receive this cancer diagnosis and approximately 3,500 Australian men die of prostate cancer each year.

"We need to raise awareness for prostate cancer and encourage conversations as this saves lives.”

Prostate cancer is generally slow growing, and in the early stages can present no symptoms.

As the cancer develops men may experience frequent or sudden need to urinate, difficulty or discomfort urinating, blood in their urine or semen and pain in the lower back, upper thighs or hips.

"It is important to seek medical advice if you are experiencing any of these symptoms, regardless of your age,” Ms Hiscock said.

"Early detection is vital, and you can manage your risk by knowing your family history, talking to your doctor about your risks, and staying up to date with prostate cancer information.”

Age and family history are risk factors strongly linked to an increased chance of developing prostate cancer. Other risk factors include genetics, diet and lifestyle.

"Maintaining a healthy diet and lifestyle is important to reducing your risk of developing any cancer,” Ms Hiscock said.

"More men die of prostate cancer than women die of breast cancer. It is very important we raise awareness and encourage open conversations.”

For more information about prostate cancer, visit the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia website.