Designer clothes donated to homeless bushfire victims

 

Residents of the bushfire-affected south coast region of Australia are about to receive truck loads of brand new, high-end designer clothing.

Not for profit organisation Thread Together has collected stock from brands and businesses including P.E. Nation, AJE and The Iconic which is in the midst of being distributed to families who have lost everything following the recent bushfire disaster.

Last week Thread Together travelled to Moruya, this week they were in Tumut, next week they will be in Bega and the following in Eden, delivering brand new current season stock to those in need.

P.E. Nation co-founder Pip Edwards said giving her popular luxe athleisure wear stock - which retails between $100 and $350 - to Thread Together was a no-brainer as it not only benefits those who have lost their homes and belongings, but it reduces the amount of stock which goes into landfill every year.

P.E. Nation Co-Founders Pip Edwards and Claire Tregoning at Thread Together in Banksmeadow where they have committed to donate clothing for bushfire-effected areas. Picture: Tim Hunter
P.E. Nation Co-Founders Pip Edwards and Claire Tregoning at Thread Together in Banksmeadow where they have committed to donate clothing for bushfire-effected areas. Picture: Tim Hunter

"We are so honoured to be a brand that can assist with this seriously great cause, promoting circular fashion, sustainability, while caring for those who have lost everything through the bushfire devastation," Edwards told The Sunday Telegraph.

"Thread Together truly cares and nurtures those who have lost everything. The stock that we give can really change a person's whole life and wellbeing during a very traumatic time.

"Thread Together are making a real difference by putting clothes on the back of people who have nothing left but they do this in such a dignified way."

Edwards and co-founder Claire Tregoning have worked closely with Thread Together to determine the types of pieces the vulnerable people affected by the fires would need.

"They need sports bras, T-shirts and jumpers," Edwards said.

"After that we are working with them in distributing leggings as they are so versatile and they can be used for women and children."

"We will also be donating larger size jumpers for men and denim for the colder months."

Thread Together - the fashion equivalent of OzHarvest - is a national organisation which takes excess new stock from clothing companies and redistributes it to people in need.

Founded in 2012 by Andie Halas, Thread Together takes discontinued, new and excess stock from fashion houses including Bec and Bridge, Toni Maticevski, Xanerobe and Tigerlily and delivers it to people who are doing it tough.

"Over the past couple of years, increasingly fashion partners have come on board and now we have hundreds of partners around the country who donate clothing to us and hundreds of charities and social service agencies that access our service," Chesler said.

"We are clothing about 2,500 people a week around the country."