WATCHING THE EXPERTS: Dalby Students got up close and personal with their future career path with the visiting Aspire to Health workshop.
WATCHING THE EXPERTS: Dalby Students got up close and personal with their future career path with the visiting Aspire to Health workshop. Emily Bradfield

Living a day in the life of a health professional

WATCHING paramedics stabilise a patient in a clinical simulation was just the beginning in a day full of hands-on learning for a group of students on Thursday, as they leapt head-first into their future career possibilities.

Fifteen Dalby Christian College and Our Lady of the Southern Cross College students got to experience a day in the life of a health professional at the Aspire to Health workshop in Dalby this week.

The workshop is the result of a collaboration between a number of universities and health organisations and recognises the importance of giving high school students exposure and hands-on experience when thinking about a career in the health industry.

Queensland Rural Medical Education manager of clinical simulations Paul Purea said the event was an opportunity for school students in rural communities to get an idea of what was available to them in the health profession.

"Most high school students have limited knowledge of what they can study at university and is typically limited to being a doctor or a nurse, so what we are trying to do is let them know about all the various professions and disciplines that are available for them to study at university and get a chance to meet clinicians and medical students,” he said.

Throughout the workshop, students had the chance to observe a clinical scenario of a patient who sustained a head and lower leg injury, following paramedics from the scene of the accident to a mock-up emergency room.

Students also got the chance to practice CPR with paramedics, learn how to stitch a wound and practice plastering.

The hands-on approach allowed the students to gain a greater understanding of health professions.

"Previously we've tried to talk to high school students and explain to them what it's about but it's hard for them to visualise and comprehend until they do a tour of a hospital and see what a hospital looks like,” Mr Purea said.

"I think it's really about them being able to visually see things and see health teams working together and just getting very hands-on.”

The program also aims to grow rural health workers through exposure to what the health profession looks like in their own region.

Aspire to Health has been running on the Darling Downs for about four years and this is their second time in Dalby with the workshop.

This year, for the first time, there has been a request for the program to be extended to Chinchilla and Roma.